Wireless backup between buildings.

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Is anyone using wireless as a backup trunk between buildings in case a hard connection goes down? I have one setup but can't keep it hooked up on the remote end because CDP is not transmitted via the wireless to keep spanning tree in check on the Cisco switches. Just wanted to see what others are doing or looking for an alternate configuration.
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Andy Cannarella

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Posted 5 years ago

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Adam Conway

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In our current implementation, Spanning tree will not work for redundancy. As part of our Mesh implementation we keep chatty L2 protocols like ARP and Spanning Tree off the network to preserve airtime and do our own loop prevention and ARP Proxy in a more efficient manner. To support what you want to do, I would recommend two routers on either end with the ability to fail over between links (one wired, one a wireless bridge). You could use trackIP or a routing protocol for tracking wired link.
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Andy Cannarella

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Thanks Adam, right now we just leave the remote side unplugged from the switch with a label where to plug in in the event the proverbial backhoe hits the fiber. :-)

So when you say router you mean like a BR200 on each end? I'll have to get with Jess and ask him about that. I have one BR200.

Andy
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Bradley Chambers, Champ

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This is a great solution. What's the range on this?
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Andy Cannarella

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Right now we are gong 100 yards line of sight using directional antennas on 5 gig. My RSSI is -61 between the devices. I bet I could double the distance easily and still be reliable without any obstructions.
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Adam Conway

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Hi Andy, so the only solution today is to put in a router (or L3 switch) or leave unplugged. A BR may not work for you, it is designed for a branch office. For this, you could just use your old j series :) now that it is going EoL (do I have a good memory or what?)
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Andy Cannarella

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Yeah the economical solution is the leave unplugged with a note to plug in when if needed. it is not a mission critical link like for a DR scenario, just need to keep the factory on the other side of the road up. It could wait for someone to come in and plug in the cable. Thanks again.
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Chris Phillips

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We're thinking of doing the same thing, but were thinking of using OSPF as our routing protocol. We currently use OSPF on our fiber ring, but we don't own the fiber and the local company (an ISP) wants to raise our rates significantly. So we thought we would run our own fiber between the buildings and use the wireless as a redundant backup, essentially creating a ring, one side fiber, the other side wireless. These two locations are separated by train tracks and both sit literally right next to the tracks. We're talking a distance of ~100yds. Do you think OSPF would route across the APs between the buildings?
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Amanda

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This is a great conversation that's separate from the main topic, so I created a new topic to continue the discussion. Please reference the new topic here: Can OSPF route across the APs between the buildings?