What are the advantages of Aerohive over Meraki?

  • 4
  • Question
  • Updated 2 years ago
  • Answered
Photo of HootSuite App

HootSuite App

  • 17 Posts
  • 0 Reply Likes

Posted 5 years ago

  • 4
Photo of Amanda

Amanda

  • 396 Posts
  • 25 Reply Likes
Thanks for the question @markhayes0338. Hopefully our community can chime in and provide some insight.
Photo of Bradley Chambers

Bradley Chambers, Champ

  • 302 Posts
  • 53 Reply Likes
Biggest thing is controller-less vs cloud controller.

Just a couple of things (there are TONS!)

1. Cloud controller (and WAN link) is required for most control plane functions (real-time operations) within the network. If your WAN link hiccups or Meraki hiccups, what happens (think about the RF optimization from a cloud controller)?

2. Meraki hardware is not great from a build perspective. It's not enterprise class.

3. Layer 3 roaming requires a Meraki MX firewall appliance at every remote location.

4. Aerohive has a public cloud or private cloud option. Meraki is public cloud only.

5. No features of the APs with Aerohive require connectivity to HiveManager. It's only for monitoring and making changes. Example: A Captive Web Portal with Meraki is served up by the cloud controller. With Aerohive, each AP is serving its own (but identical) CWP. What happens if Meraki has an outage?

6. Aerohive's band steering is much better than Meraki's in my testing. Aerohive makes use of both bands, but Meraki largely just forces everything to 5 ghz.

7. Drastically better air time fairness with Aerohive

Again this is just a few, but Meraki is one of the last WiFi vendors I'd choose. They have a decent UI, but everything else is SOHO at best. It's just not on the same level with Aerohive.
Photo of Jono Hayes

Jono Hayes

  • 1 Post
  • 0 Reply Likes
1. Meraki's cloud use the "same" architecture as Aerohive, if the site(s) goes off-line the devices (wireless, security or switching) work using the last synced config (from the cloud). You will loss live data in the dashboard but that will sync back up once the site comes online. 

Also a note: Meraki isn't a Cloud controller...

2. Are you serious... ha

3. This isn't true...

4. This is true, don't see it being a big disadvantage. As a huge portion of Aerohive users would use HiveManager online.

5. Agin the same as point 1, the devices (wireless, security or switching) work using the last synced config (from the cloud). You will loss live data in the dashboard but that will sync back up once the site comes online. 

6. How did you test this? in out lab we got mixed results.

7. We didn't see this at all, again how did you test this?
Photo of Crowdie

Crowdie, Champ

  • 972 Posts
  • 272 Reply Likes

As I am certified in both Meraki and Aerohive here is what I have found with experience of both products:

Meraki's cloud use the "same" architecture as Aerohive, if the site(s) goes off-line the devices (wireless, security or switching) work using the last synced config (from the cloud).

1.  The Meraki and Aerohive architecture are completely different.  Meraki access points are controlled through the cloud.  Basically take a locally switched wireless LAN controller design and place the wireless LAN controller in the cloud.   Aerohive access points have no wireless LAN controller and decisions, such as radio resource management, are made between the access points.  The Aerohive architecture does not have to work on a "sync'd config" as all decisions are made in real time between the access points rather than a controller in the cloud.

2.  From a build point of view the Meraki access points look OK but their layer one and two functionality is limited compared to Aerohive.   If you are looking at Cisco wireless products for an advanced deployment you would be much better off deploying "traditional" Cisco as their access points have superior layer one and two functionality in comparison to Meraki.

3.  Layer three roaming with Meraki requires a MX appliance.  Whether you need one at every site or not depends on the design.  Basically if you are deploying Meraki you need to seriously look at deploying a MX appliance.

4.  Having an on-premise option is an advantage in certain industries (finance, healthcare, etc.) but if you are looking at a cloud deployment both Aerohive and Meraki have cloud management.  As per point #1 Meraki is cloud controlled so this is a disadvantage in "mission critical" deployments (terminology used by the Meraki trainer when I asked about this) and in industries where the cloud is an issue.

5.  In our testing and at some of our customers when the Meraki cloud controller was not available the Meraki access points remained up but functionality was extremely limited and at some sites wireless clients remained associated but throughput dropped to almost zero.

6.  Aerohive supports spectrum based loud balancing and multi-spectrum band steering.  Meraki supports moving 2.4 GHz clients to 5 GHz but this limitation can result in the 5 GHz spectrum becoming congested.   Careful channel design can get around this limitation but Meraki should just improve their band steering engine.

7.  Aerohive (as well as Aruba, Cisco and Motorola) has superior layer one and two functionality as well as spectrum based load balancing and band steering.  What this means is that if a fully qualified wireless engineer configures the Aerohive/Aruba/Cisco/Motorola wireless network it will have better airtime fairness than Meraki.   Meraki needs to improve their layer one and two functionality - for example, add the ability to disable all the 802.11b data rates rather than just the 1, 2 and 5.5 Mbps data rates.

My original thoughts on Meraki still stand:

  • Meraki is too expensive for what it offers.  If you want a cloud managed solution look at Aerohive, Aruba or Motorola as all these vendors have superior products at the same price point.
  • Meraki is targeted (well in my country anyway) at engineers who do small server deployments, SME switches, etc.  Meraki focuses on the "flashy" features and seems to ignore layer one two, which is where the serious wireless vendors focus heavily.
  • You should not have to pay full price for wireless equipment you "rent".  If you stop paying Meraki their support fee the wireless network is disabled.  If it not, as with other vendors, that you can't get support and new firmware - your wireless network turns off.  This would be OK if the hardware was free or extremely cheap but it is not OK when the equipment is full price.
 
(Edited)
Photo of Mark Hayes

Mark Hayes

  • 1 Post
  • 0 Reply Likes
Thanks for the info Bradley! I'm looking forward to getting the test AP in to play around with. I wish I had at least 2 or 3 to test roaming and what not, but 1 will do for now. Thanks again, it sounds like Aerohive has the edge.
Photo of Brian Powers

Brian Powers, Champ

  • 396 Posts
  • 92 Reply Likes
From a fellow Aerohive VAR, Bradley is mostly spot on.

Here is a link detailing out some of Meraki's cloud architecture, http://meraki.cisco.com/blog/2012/01/... . Most all the shortcomings that Meraki does have here are problems that Aerohive has already solved. That being said, most of their shortcomings are now minimal and will probably soon be gone.

I'm not sure on the technical specifications (RAM, processor, etc.) of Meraki's hardware, but claiming their hardware isint "enterprise class" may be a stretch.

As for L3 roaming, unless your in a very large organization, needing to do Layer 3 roaming is seldom used.

Doing your own testing in your environment will be the best way to make a decision on which solution works for you and meets your needs. You should be able to reach out to your local VAR and get another AP or two so you can fully test it (Aerohive) in all its greatness!

And if you need any assistance getting things setup, feel free to ask around here. I'm sure you'd get lots of assistance and pointers to get you a good setup for your tests.
Photo of Crowdie

Crowdie, Champ

  • 972 Posts
  • 272 Reply Likes
I noted with interest that at a recent Cisco presentation on Meraki they positioned it below enterprise class. Cisco started their enterprise product range with the 2600 series wireless LAN controllers.

Cisco all but said that Meraki was not suitable for mission critical wireless deployments and deployments where the wireless LAN was the primary network.
Photo of Crowdie

Crowdie, Champ

  • 972 Posts
  • 272 Reply Likes
The big "ouches" for me with Meraki are:

* Some of the control plane still requires access to the Meraki cloud controller. So if the Internet connection is lost some functionality, such as Radio Management, is lost as well. Possibly the worst thing that could happen to a Meraki wireless network is that a network fault drops connectivity to the Internet and makes the Meraki access points reboot. When the Meraki access points reboot and can't make contact with the cloud controller how are they going to configure their radio settings? Will all the Meraki access points have the same channel settings with the radio transmit power set to full power?

* If you stop paying support the whole Meraki solution is "bricked" after 30 days. Have a very careful look at the licensing small print - we have had this confirmed by Cisco. So if you deploy 100 Meraki access points and the customer decides they don't want to keep paying support the access points will stop functioning. In the event that the same thing happens with an Aerohive deployment the wireless network continues to function but the customer cannot get any new updates.

So if you deploy Meraki you have locked your customer into having to pay support each month or risk having some very expensive paper weights. If Meraki gave the customer the hardware for no charge and then charged a monthly support cost I wouldn't have an issue but when the customer has to pay for the hardware and then on top has to pay a support charge to use it each month it is a bit rough.
Photo of Anjanesh Babu

Anjanesh Babu

  • 68 Posts
  • 7 Reply Likes
If I may focus on the pros of Meraki - since we all know about Aerohive anyway.

Having used a Meraki AP12 for a while I would say it come out tops when you want to connect a remote site to home . Simple click and go you have a layer2 link back home.

Must say I am yet to figure out Aerohive branch office vpn despite numerous attempts at this and I am no where near. Don't even get me started on firewalls on Aerohive :-) . Meraki ? Works flawlessly all the way up to layer 7 .

Using a Meraki AP12 and the virtual VPN concentrator I can tunnel SSIDS or wired network in a few clicks to my datacenter .
Yes , you need a cloud controller and access to the internet but since Meraki's runs off Google's cloud performance issues are next to none .
Features out of the box

- Meraki comes with tons of features out of the box include card payments, logging, remote testing ,analytics and a lots more that is added on .
if you are an SMB'ish setup with reasonably skills and want to have a wireless solution in a box without the management overhead Meraki could be good value for money especially if you are globally distributed.
yes Meraki's business model is built around repetitive business and this is one of the reasons why perhaps Cisco acquired it.

Meraki is a nimble organisation with excellent customer service (definitely far superior to Aerohive in my experience) and leads by making sure the customer is at the center. Though of late, I seem to be coming across to more proactive technical support staff at Aerohive who have a sense of ownership to resolve the issues. Could be a tie very soon.

Meraki's fire and forget mode is particularly attractive for distributed offices since their wireless and wired kit seamlessly connects back home for management without local intervention. This saves time in terms of sorting out the management plane for switches etc .

Meraki also seems to be bringing out more innovative features for eg. Facebook login or MDM integration as well a integrated card payment gateway at no extra charge.

Oh - Meraki also do a free unlimited version of the MDM which is yours to use . No strings attached.

In short , if you are considering an all in one solution with no hassles or learning curves on a longer term reoccurring expense model - Meraki is the way to go.

It does lack the Aerohive USP of private psks and a lot more that I am sure we are all aware of.
But in the real world of getting things quick and easy vs in house ownership of wireless assets both Meraki and Aerohive have their roles to play.

Edit: customer service opinion of Aerohive. getting better.
Photo of Bradley Chambers

Bradley Chambers, Champ

  • 302 Posts
  • 53 Reply Likes
When I demo'd Meraki, I'd have to reboot the APs every few days as they'd stop passing traffic. Unless it's changed, the earlier models lacked bandpass filters between the 2.4 and 5 ghz radios.

Meraki is a fine home product. It's like a high end Netgear with cloud management.

I've always had great luck with Aerohive support. They have taken great care of Me. My local SE periodically stops by and checks on my configs at no charge.

The free MDM is okay, but I wouldn't invest a lot into it. MDM is getting huge in iOS 7, so I wouldn't rely on a product that is used as a loss leader from a company who got bought. It could be shut down tomorrow. If you need MDM, pay for it.

Little known fact about Aerohive: all products running single OS. Meraki has different code for different products. It may all be in a single login, but their switches are running a diff OS than their APs. Aerohive took the time to have a single code base. Did their switches come out later? Sure, but they were doing it right. Aerohive isn't about being first, but being the best.

I'm not an anti-cloud guy (we use a ton of cloud services), but I'm not willing to put key network architecture pieces offsite.

Above all else (sorry for the short and scattered reply, but my wife and I welcomed our second child into the world yesterday), it's telling who Apple recommends with their edu sales staff. Apple has no vested interested in Aerohive other than have rock solid WiFi for their big Edu deployments.
Photo of Anjanesh Babu

Anjanesh Babu

  • 68 Posts
  • 7 Reply Likes
Hey Bradley - first and foremost congratulations !
---
Re customer support -Your experiences are consistent with US customers with whom Aerohive deal directly rather than the reseller .

On single OS and switches - does it really matter as long as management is seamless and easy ? I am sure if you ask Meraki they can probably come up with a dozen reasons why different OS is good (hardware etc) and this is probably a different subject in itself. sure single OS is good mainly from a vendor perspective to reduce costs and management overheads.

On the cloud frontier - totally agree and we don't use cloud at all . No point putting any key pieces offsite. The situation could be comparable to those using hivemanager online or don't want a in house solution to maintain a global setup.

in a fast changing technology ecosystem all companies and their technologies have their role to play as well as markets to reach out to.
Photo of Bradley Chambers

Bradley Chambers, Champ

  • 302 Posts
  • 53 Reply Likes
Thanks:) I need more coffee. Thankfully this is baby 2, so I st least know what's coming.

Re OS: fewer code means easier to find bugs and security holes. That's the trend in the tech industry right now. Look at what's happening with iOS/Mac and Windows 8/Windows Phone, and Xbox. It's like The Lord of the rings: one code to rule them all;)

HiveManager Online and Meraki's Controller are drastically different. See: http://blogs.aerohive.com/blog/cloud-...

TL;DR version: If I lose connectivity to HMOL, nothing happens internally. Everything runs as normal. The only way a user would know is because the lights of the AP are different. In fact, I heard a story about a customer who only booted up his local HiveManager when he needed to make changes. He stored it on a thumb drive and locked it in his desk when not in use. All AP functions happen directly on the AP. what does your network look like if Meraki goes out of business (or gets shutdown by Cisco)? What does your Aerohive network look like? Drastically different endings.
Photo of Anjanesh Babu

Anjanesh Babu

  • 68 Posts
  • 7 Reply Likes
Singular code base is possible good for consumer products.no doubt there. Apple is moving to integrate functions yes but still keeping the platforms different due to fundamental different in hardware. Even with Windows 8 (RT vs 'the usual') , compatibility is far from complete due to underlying processor architecture. When you take a step back and look at more bespoke hardware upstream different views exist to run the same OS on multiple device platforms. But move towards single code base is no doubt a common trend.End of the day it depends on whether this singularity translates or breaks the abstractness of the user experience. If the product is simple to use and intuitive - who cares ?

I would not recommend cloudwashing the entire wireless infrastructure - that is putting the management plane out of your reach.

Same lines, would not actually deploy a complete infrastructure on a internet 'cloud' managed product like HMOL or Meraki's clound controller whatever their strengths.

I don't know how Meraki behaves locally when the WAN is down simply because this is not what we use it for - it is to connect L2 devices at remote site to base.In which case if the WAN is down, the local connectivity is irrelevant. Setting this up took me 10 minutes.

If I am looking to connect remote sites quickly and easily I would be interested in the simplistic offerings by Meraki and not Aerohive at this point - in the same way if I am looking to setup massively scalable wireless infrastructure I would look to Aerohive.

When it comes to selection of technologies - different companies offer different things that are nice in their own way.
Photo of Crowdie

Crowdie, Champ

  • 972 Posts
  • 272 Reply Likes
Good luck trying to lock down the differences between Aerohive and Meraki. I am currently working on an Aerohive vs Aruba vs Cisco document so our wireless engineers can determine which feature set best suits each customer's requirements but it is extremely difficult. There are common features with each vendor but:

* Vendors can have huge differences in how they implement the same feature. Trying to explain the differences without becoming an appendix to the CWNP program is rather difficult.
* Commonly features are interlinked and this effects how they operate. For example, the interlink between integrated stateful firewalls, spectrum analysis and WIPS.
* Trying to get low level information from some vendors is extremely difficult as more and more they are speaking in generalizations.
* The range of products from each vendor is growing almost daily and keeping up is difficult.
Photo of Matthew Rudkowski

Matthew Rudkowski

  • 38 Posts
  • 2 Reply Likes
Crowdie -- Would be interested to see this doc, I'm working on evaluating all 3 at the moment and it's a bear of a task!
Photo of Roberto Casula

Roberto Casula, Champ

  • 231 Posts
  • 111 Reply Likes
Been in this game for a long time and twas ever thus. It used to be Airespace vs. Aruba vs. Trapeze. We generally found that whichever vendor was able to get the first meeting with the customer would win the business. All they had to do was to convince them that their strong point was the most important. For Airespace, it was all about the RF, stupid. For Aruba, it was security. For Trapeze, it was all about the user.

We originally sold Airespace (until Cisco bought them and ruined it...just sayin') then for various reasons not entirely within our control we ended up selling Trapeze for a time (wish we hadn't). We took on Aerohive very soon after they launched in the UK because they were addressing real technical issues that were causing us problems in our customer base with the controller-based solutions and had a real technical solution. We didn't sell a single new Trapeze solution after that and all but two of our Airespace/Cisco/Trapeze customers have now migrated to Aerohive.

It works the same today as it did back then, but in spades...Aerohive. Meraki. AirTight. Ruckus. Meru. Aruba. Xirrus.(Who have I forgotten). I bet I could convince a customer that any one of these was the way to go (I'm very persuasive when I have to be) and the others have got it wrong.

And let's not forget Juniper, Cisco (Enterprise), Motorola and their OEM partners and even Avaya are still plugging away. Bless.

So yes. Vendor comparison is next-to-impossible.

My advice: Don't make a choice based on individual vendors - they're all as good and as bad as each other. Choose a partner to work with that can provide the support you need across your estate and all its integration and interaction layers. Not that I'm biased :)
Photo of Volkan Bagci

Volkan Bagci

  • 55 Posts
  • 3 Reply Likes
Crowdie, is it possible to send me the document? We are between Aruba and Aerohivefor 10 sites. thanks, volkan@sonans.no
Photo of Crowdie

Crowdie, Champ

  • 972 Posts
  • 272 Reply Likes
Unfortunately a large percentage of the document contains confidential information supplied by wireless vendors so the document is for internal use only. Sorry.
Photo of Roberto Casula

Roberto Casula, Champ

  • 231 Posts
  • 111 Reply Likes
Despite having to declare an interest in that we have been an Aerohive reseller for many years (one of the first in the UK), I reviewed Meraki shortly before the Cisco acquisition as part of my ongoing due diligence around our portfolio. I have switched horses in the past if I felt it was the right thing for my customers, so I do try to be pragmatic and unprejudiced! I've also kept up with developments at Meraki to a degree since as I know a couple of people that work for them in the UK and they keep pestering me to look at it again every time they have a new feature :)

The APs at the time certainly did have some build quality issues. The lack of bandpass filter has already been mentioned. 5GHz performance was definitely compromised. This may no longer be the case. The APs also felt quite cheap generally - I believe they were at the time using a low-cost "off the shelf" AP with their software loaded; this was as I understand it a legacy of Meraki's origins (MIT Roofnet/OpenWRT).

My general impression of the whole setup was that it was strongly geared towards being quick and easy for a small deployment or for where there are a large number of sites but small number of APs per site (e.g. a franchise operation). There is no doubt that to get a Meraki AP from the box to getting a working network using WPA2-PSK is very quick and easy.

Most of the out-of-the-box configuration options however were not appropriate for Enterprise deployments and there was a definite lack of flexibility in configuration. There were a number of things I wanted to do (I'm afraid I can't remember the exact features, but I was just running through mirroring typical things we need to do in most of our deployments) that, when queried, Meraki said could be done, but I'd have to raise a support ticket to get it configured "on the back end" as the option wasn't exposed in the management UI. Again, this might have changed since I did my review.

I also got the impression that Meraki's M.O. is to provide highly-publicised "gimmicks" to attract customers and disrupt competitors that often don't stand up to close scrutiny in real-world Enterprise environments.

Their L7 control and reporting is really basic and limited (as is Aerohive's copy-cat feature introduced in 6.0). For Enterprises, I'd never push it; go buy a Palo Alto firewall if you want this kind of control and visibility.

The Meraki Mobile Device Management (which Aerohive have also now mirrored in the 6.1 release) is OK, but again it does not have the breadth of features that dedicated MDM solutions have and my feeling is many Enterprises will still have to implement a full-blown MDM product.

Recently, they have been pushing their integration into CloudShark for packet capture. Having looked into this feature, it is in reality quite limited for many troubleshooting scenarios and is nowhere near as flexible and useful as Aerohive's remote packet capture support. This is again primarily because of the limited ability of their on-premise elements to do much more than forward user traffic.

One thing that really concerned me was around privacy. This is not cloudophobia; there were some very specific and worrying things in their privacy policy (most of which have now been removed, but not all of them) which essentially gave them the right to capture information about users' use of the Meraki system (including MAC addresses of users - specifically mentioned in the privacy policy) and for Meraki to use this information AND PROVIDE IT TO THIRD PARTIES. Whether or not this was just bad wording in the policy, it made me nervous and - from my perspective as a reseller - had the potential to open up minefields around EU data protection law that I really didn't want to be walking into. With Aerohive, very little information resides in the cloud with HMOL and we always have the option for on-premise HiveManager.

I also found Meraki's troubleshooting capabilities to be limited. Spectrum Analysis on the AP is useful (of course we have that on Aerohive too) but really troubleshooting buggy/problematic client devices proved next to impossible. Again, things may have improved here.

Both Aerohive and Meraki have their "killer features" and have lost business to each other because of those features. What I find interesting is that Aerohive have now implemented many of Meraki's features and have done so because the features, while very useful, are not actually particularly difficult to implement or innovative in nature. Yet from what I've seen Meraki have not implemented Aerohive's "killer features"; in many cases I believe this is because their architecture precludes them from doing so. In others, it may be because Aerohive have genuinely innovated and have patented the feature. Whether this changes with Cisco's engineering force behind them will be interesting.

I would certainly not say that Aerohive is a perfect product - is anything? - and there are definitely some things that Meraki does better than Aerohive. But on balance, for Enterprises, I think Aerohive trumps Meraki in many things that really matter. Here are a few:

Local control plane (faster reaction to changing RF, plus no dependency on cloud)
Private Pre-shared Key
Remote packet capture
Comprehensive CLI and debug logging capabilities on every AP
On-premise management option
Extremely granular configuration settings rather than "one size fits all"
Dynamic Airtime Scheduling
Granular Enterprise-focussed QoS configuration

Not as eye-catchingly exciting as saying "Look, your guests can authenticate to the WiFi using their Facebook login!!", but in an Enterprise...what's more important, that or the ability to troubleshoot why the CEO's laptop keeps dropping off the network?
Photo of Anjanesh Babu

Anjanesh Babu

  • 68 Posts
  • 7 Reply Likes
Hey Roberto,
Nicely written review - though I would suggest that from my experience , the 'gimmicks' seem to be more on the side of Aerohive as well (branch office connectivity ,vpn etc).
As far I am concerned for my specific use getting branch office connectivity to home is a few click effort on Meraki and at possibly half the price of a similar offering from any vendor.
"Enterprise" is a loose term and the goal posts keep moving. Often, with constraints on money ,expertise and global reach multivendor tech may be the best option than placing all eggs in one basket.
Nothing wrong in actually picking up vendors for what they are good at and keeping an eye on fast evolving tech - with your experience in this field, having seen the water flow under the bridge etc , this would perhaps be obvious.
As for FaceBook login , as more and more enterprises especially those providing free public wifi would expect metrics of use beyond a fake email address on captive portal . This could be the next turning point in 'social wireless' .
Of course, you could use the shadow presence analytics with its questionable ethics on subtly gathering visitor data or openly ask users for social login in return for free wifi. Again , not your type of 'enterprise' but valuable for public hot sports,academia and hospitality industry .

I would agree that L7 insight is best provided by dedicated units but for SMB , this end to end featureset would be useful .
Again, Aerohive has tons of features and perhaps the 'VMWare' of wireless industry with experts and ultra experienced power users able to vouch for its touted benefits.

As long as the demand is there across the market and smaller nimbler innovations continue there is scope of other vendors and not just Meraki alongside other kit in any organisation. Thus research well, demo and then deploy.
Photo of Crowdie

Crowdie, Champ

  • 972 Posts
  • 272 Reply Likes
I have found over the years that true enterprise vendors have a large range of configurable features in their products as the enterprise networks they can be deployed in can be extremely complex.

When the LAN engineers comes to you and say that the wireless network must support of large number of obscure settings the enterprise wireless vendors can, generally, be configured to support those settings; although it may take a few calls to the vendor's support engineers to get it all configured. With SOHO wireless vendors the configurability may be limited (2.4 GHz to 5 GHz band steering only, station count load balancing only (no support for airtime based load balancing), etc) or non-existent. This doesn't mean that the SOHO product is poor, it just isn't enterprise class - including in price.
Photo of Anjanesh Babu

Anjanesh Babu

  • 68 Posts
  • 7 Reply Likes
I think there is a major difference in "enterprise grade " if you start comparing costs in a manner of perspective.

In the private sector, being expensive and feature rich with layers of incomprehensible time to deploy extra feature set is bracketed as "Enterprise Grade" .
In the public / education sector (or at least that I am familiar with), money is a scarce resource but the user expectations are what you would categorize an 'Enterprise Grade Demand' . Students,public and staff expect far greater service that we can afford to with expensive gear and the kit that is quickest to deploy within or less than budgets ,scalable beyond cities and provides a no -nonsense customer service wins.
Photo of Nick Lowe

Nick Lowe, Official Rep

  • 2491 Posts
  • 451 Reply Likes
The features are needed to make it Enterprise grade exactly because they add the great service that users expect when configured correctly.

Due to the differences in use cases that people have, it cannot be automatic or pre-configured.

Where missing, the service will be suboptimal.
Photo of Anjanesh Babu

Anjanesh Babu

  • 68 Posts
  • 7 Reply Likes
there is no need to be automatic .. just intuitive or easy to use .

My thought was just because Brand X is cheaper than Brand Y does still mean that brand X kit still can support users in larger number than brand Y or be considered sub enterprise grade in quality.

Could be naive but this in my books would be X = Y = enterprise kit without that enterprise wallet.
Photo of Crowdie

Crowdie, Champ

  • 972 Posts
  • 272 Reply Likes
The educational sector is a difficult beast as you can walk into schools in the richer areas and they have a segmented network with firewalls, routers, switches, a fast WAN link and internal IT staff. You walk into schools in poorer areas and the entire network is flat (a single VLAN - commonly VLAN 1) and there are no firewalls or layer three devices and their Internet link is ADSL. Extremely hard to treat these two extremes as a single sector (from a wireless point of view).
Photo of Anjanesh Babu

Anjanesh Babu

  • 68 Posts
  • 7 Reply Likes
and just because a school is poor does not mean it provides sub standard wireless to users or that their expectations are less important .
how you creatively deliver within budget in a vendor agnostic fashion is more likely to be beneficial.
Photo of Nick Lowe

Nick Lowe, Official Rep

  • 2491 Posts
  • 451 Reply Likes
Do we know if Meraki managed to improve on their ability to cope under load from a set of iPads in newer firmware? Configuration of data rates? There's little in it between Aruba's and Aerohive's 3x3:3 performance in the same test.

On the feature front, I still lean towards Aerohive as Aruba Instant does not yet have full feature parity with their controller based products nor, in my opinion, Aerohive's offering.





Photo of thewifigeek

thewifigeek, Champ

  • 86 Posts
  • 12 Reply Likes
On behalf of Nick, here is the reference link for charts - http://www.wlanpros.com/wp-content/up...
Photo of Crowdie

Crowdie, Champ

  • 972 Posts
  • 272 Reply Likes
Here are a couple of things to add:

* You cannot manually set the data rates as mandatory (basic), optional or not supported (N/A). This is obviously an issue with high density deployments or deployments supporting video and/or voice applications.

* You can disable the 1, 2 and 5.5 Mbps data rates through a check box option but not the 11 Mbps data rate.

* Only the new MR34 802.11ac access point can produce spectrum analysis graphs. The MR12, MR16, MR24, MR62 and MR66 802.11n access points do not have this functionality.

* A number of the advertised services are, in fact, subscription services and were "pushed" at the CMNA certification course as an "ongoing revenue stream".
Photo of Martha Nicole Kubin

Martha Nicole Kubin

  • 1 Post
  • 1 Reply Like
MERAKI WILL BREAK YOUR NETWORK
Tonight I got a call from a customer telling me that all the websites using the meraki wifi are being redirected to a page that says the network is "misconfigured" and that the customer needs to call me up on a saturday to fix it. The problem is the cloud controller license is expired, so rather than disable the cloud controller, meraki BROKE THE NETWORK just to get my attention. Well guess what Meraki, it worked. You got my attention. Your FIRED. As far as I am concerned you are a ticking time bomb and need to die. I am sledge hammering (2) MR-12s and a MR-15 tonight instead of spending time with my family.
Photo of BJ

BJ, Champ

  • 374 Posts
  • 45 Reply Likes
So sorry you lost a weekend to them.
Photo of Gracie Quijada

Gracie Quijada

  • 1 Post
  • 0 Reply Likes
Nice analysis ! For what it's worth , if you has been needing to merge PDF files , my business saw a tool here http://www.altomerge.com/.