Support for international characters in user manager generated account names?

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I have been playing with the user manager for temporary user accounts with PPSK.

But it will not accept our Danish letters (æøå) in names of users.

In the year 2013, that can be called an insult. It can't be a mistake or that "we didn't know", because these letters have been the same since ASCII was invented, and it has been a problem ever since. Now we have Unicode.

Imagine a company where customers are coming in as guests, how can they accept to not be able to write their correct names on their badges?
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Søren Theilgaard

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Posted 5 years ago

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Amanda

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Hi Søren,

I wanted to let you know that folks on our end are researching this and will be back with a response when we are able.

Thanks,

Amanda
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Mike Kouri, Official Rep

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Søren,
My sincere apologies, I had meant to post this reply a couple weeks ago, but it slipped thru the cracks and only today was it brought to my attention that we haven't followed up with you.

While we agree that any user management system developed nowadays should be Unicode safe, the reality is that the User Manager is an old component and was not written to be Unicode safe.

We have been working on a superior solution called ID Manager. We currently do not have plans to address this issue in User Manager. Please let us know if you have follow up questions or comments and we can discuss offline.
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Crowdie, Champ

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Since there does not appear to be much development of the integrated User Manager what is the chance of integrating some of the ID Manager features into the HiveManager NMS? I understand that some of the ID Manager features are not suitable for integration into HiveManager but if we could have the features that are suitable integrated it would be greatly appreciated.

The original Aerohive design philosophy was that the entire wireless network consisted of the access points and a HiveManager NMS (excluding any external authentication requirements). With cloud only releases Aerohive seems to be moving away from this design philosophy.
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Nick Lowe, Official Rep

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Mike,

In the nicest possible way, that is an incredibly disingenuous comment to make.

The same was true when Aerohive's User Manager was first written and it was then a new component. Widespread use of Unicode heavily pre-dates the formation of your company and its use has been best practice for a very long time.

So, it clearly was then just a poor design choice at the time to have a dependency on ASCII. It can have absolutely nothing to do with its relative age.

Regards,

Nick
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Mike Kouri, Official Rep

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Crowdie,

What are the chances? Probably pretty slim. I understand your viewpoint, and your experience with Aerohive may well be longer than mine, so I can't argue whether our design philosophy has morphed or not. I just don't see any further investment in user manager other than bug fixes, especially those which would reduce demand for our ID Manager.

Nick,

Yeah, okay, you're right. It was a poor decision. It was made a long time ago, by my predecessors. We haven't had any complaints, at least none that have gotten to me, until now. It's in an area of code that has had other stuff built around it and interwoven with it, and we don't want to mess with it any more than we absolutely have to in fear of unanticipated side effects.

To you both and all the other lurkers out there,

The squeaky wheel gets the grease. If you strongly feel that this one issue will affect your decisions to buy, or buy more of, our products, speak up. Give me ammunition to justify allocating resources towards it. Otherwise, we will continue to assume we have at most only a few dissatisfied customers, not enough to tip the cost/benefit ratio the other way.
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Nick Lowe, Official Rep

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Appreciate the hands up, mea culpa, reply, Mike.

Personally, I have always loathed the binary it's a bug / it's a feature request division that many vendors seem to espouse. The reality is that it is often far more of a grey area and is subjective. To my mind, and I have development experience under my belt, I would consider this a bug. (And yes, even if something works to specification and design intent, the design can itself be defective and the honourable thing to do is to get it right, even if doing so is a painful, resource consuming process.)

The only musing that I have re: your last point is that I suspect that much of where the business falls in the wireless sector is based on word of mouth behind the scenes from a vendor's existing customers.

Certainly within my sphere of influence in educational environments, Aerohive, along other wireless vendors, has been discussed heavily. (The IT discussion group of the private-and-wealthy independent schools in the UK.) BYOD and the infrastructure required to support it really is a hot topic.

Don't worry, I've never said anything bad, quite the opposite actually... my point is simply the abstract one that I suspect much of your business, more than you might realise, comes to you that way. More so the spark of interest that makes a potential customer look and consider your products and services.

People always like reassurance from their peers in other places that they're doing the right thing. The technically stronger, early adopters from that group who are prepared to initially go out on a limb with lesser established vendors are those that I would always put the greater effort in to placating due to them often being decision influencers. I would be wary indeed about making them feel disenfranchised once you have their money and if they then hit real problems.

This particular issue does not affect me directly but I can certainly can see how it could affect others. Were I a potential customer, how well it is now handled would certainly affect my decision to buy. (But perhaps I am just weird, unusual and atypical in that regard...)

Cheers,

Nick
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Crowdie, Champ

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In our market, and probably a number of the "smaller" markets, I have found that two features really sell the Aerohive product:

1. Private PSK
2. No wireless LAN controller (and the cost thereof)

The following are some important factors as well:

* Integrated firewall
* No on-going licenses (on-premise deployments only)

As the vast majority of our deployments are on-premise the Private PSK solution hasn't really changed much and, as you can see from a number of threads, the limitations of User Manager are starting to adversely affect our customers so it adversely affects us.

From my point of view adding the following functionality to User Manager/HiveManager would be a good start:

* Having an option so a reoccurring PPSK could have its details automatically E-mailed to a recipient or recipients
* Having a SSID parameter option so, for example, the date or day of the week could be embedded into the SSID
* Having an option so similar characters (I and 1, 0 and O, etc.) aren’t placed into Private PSK passphrases
* Extending the number of Private PSKs the lower model access points, such as the AP-121, can support (4,000 is just not enough anymore for enterprise deployments)
* Allowing more than one access point to act as a Private PSK server

As companies (Cisco in particular) continue to drop the pricing on the wireless LAN controllers, such as the Cisco 2500 series, the project hardware cost differential between Aerohive and the wireless LAN controller vendors is getting closer and closer. I recently priced up a local government deployment and the project hardware cost differential between Aerohive and Cisco was only a couple of thousand dollars. With such a small project hardware cost differential it is starting to really fall on the Private PSK solution to “sell” Aerohive for our smaller deployments and this is why I put such a high priority on Private PSK functionality.

Now don't get me wrong, the new functionality that has been added by Aerohive is great and allows us to make some great solutions but when you are the fifth company to present that day you need a "killer" feature that makes your product reach out and slap the potential customer around the gills and, in my market, that is commonly the Private PSK.
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Nick Lowe, Official Rep

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* Having an option so a reoccurring PPSK could have its details automatically E-mailed to a recipient or recipients. Massive +1