Skype for Business VoIP over WLAN

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  • Updated 3 years ago
We are an environment with Aerohive APs, 370's and 330's, as well as BR100's for home offices. We previously had a shoretel phone system and are talking about moving to a full Skype for Business (Lync) with PSTN system to replace our existing phone system. With that, I'm concerned about the stability of phone calls since 90% of our users will be going over wireless with their phone traffic now. 

Anyone else have any experience with heavy Skype/Lync useage over WiFi? I'm sure its not using typical VoIP protocols, and more likely using HTTPS. Any suggestions on config adjustments, best practices, etc? We're looking at approximately 5-15 clients per AP, mostly 1x1:1 laptops.
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Dave

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  • unsure

Posted 3 years ago

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Mike Kouri, Official Rep

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We use MS-Lync here at Aerohive, and have recently completed the MS-Lync certification suite for AP330/350. I'm waiting for all the paperwork to complete and for us to appear on their hardware compatibility lists at https://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/office/dn788945. We will be submitting the other access points for certification over the next few weeks and months (testing isn't free, and our pockets aren't as deep as some of our competitors).

Lync does use standard VoIP protocols, and there's not a lot you need to do. For casual users, on the order of a handful of concurrent VoIP calls per access point, you don't HAVE to do anything. If you are worried about voice call quality, then you CAN create classifier maps and marker maps and bind them to your interfaces and SSIDs.
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Dave

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Are you using Lync on Premise, or Office 365? I guess a big detail I left out is that we are using Office 365. As we are testing this, what should I be looking for from an AP performance aspect? I just want to be able to eliminate the wireless as a trouble point if we can. Also any experience with the BR100's?
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intvlan1shut

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We're 365 as well and it's looking like we may move to using SfB a lot more. Any updates from either the OP or Mike? Also, I'll be deploying a bunch of 230s soon, any news on their certification?
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Dave

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In our experience (we are a reseller of Aerohive) 230's have been completely solid. We've had no issues with any of our customers with the 230's. 
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Dave

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Update after testing: we've been in beta on the PSTN Skype for Business for most of our company but not all. We have been using Skype regularly internally with all users. From our experience, the BR100's just cannot handle Skype. While CPU/RAM statistics don't point to them struggling, we were constantly dropping calls and having poor quality issues if the BR100's were involved. If we removed them and let the user use their home router, we had significantly less issues. I would expect the BR200's perform better. 

For the QoS aspect, our Aerohive engineer just suggested we enable 802.1p/DiffServ/802.11e in the Classifier map and Marker Map. While I feel like I should be adding QoS by Service in the Classifier Map, I left it what our SE suggested and we've had relatively little issues. 
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Mike Kouri, Official Rep

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Dave,
The BR100 is unfortunately getting very long in the tooth and while it was adequate for the expected network traffic at the time it was designed, it does as you've observed get overwhelmed with modern traffic patterns and rates. I personally recommend that it be considered for personal-router situations only. if you have five or more wireless clients or a high speed internet connection such as cable-modems in US homes, then I generally recommend our BR200 instead.
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intvlan1shut

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Thanks for the info Dave. Any chance you have a location where you have a secured employee only SSID, are using SfB and have a "guest" SSID with all 3 having fairly good traffic/high # of concurrent users?

I'm in a local government setting and we have a lot of "shared space" locations so lots of interference that I can't do much about as well as a lot of locations where there's a lot of employee wireless use as well as "guest" use. Now I've tuned things so the guest will get downgraded service in order to maintain the QOS for employees but have you had any issues where SfB was sketchy due to the airspace just being a mess and or SfB likely acted as the straw that broke the camels back and service across the board took a hit since it was put into everyday use?

Just wondering if I should be concerned

Thanks again for the info!

- John
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Dave

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Not specifically with SfB, but we have done similar environment with SIP phones. The biggest thing we usually target are the clients. The clients can make or break your connectivity. If you can ensure you get AC clients (or at a minimum 5Ghz) you shouldn't see too much of a problem. Just make sure you set the Radio profile to Urge 5Ghz. When you setup the QoS, you can enable DiffServ and 802.11e/802.1p on your "employee only" network specifically so you don't worry about a guest doing skype taking priority. 

To give you a quick example we hit on Monday; we had one employee on their home network sharing their screen and a conference call to 5 employees all connected to the same AP230. We didn't notice any performance or voice cutout of any kind. Only 1 of those clients is AC. 
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intvlan1shut

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Thanks Dave! I appreciate all the insight.