RF design seems to be the most difficult part of wi-fi. Especcially with Bluetooth and other applications in 2.4Ghz. Any recommendations?

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RF design seems to be the most difficult part of wi-fi. Especcially with Bluetooth and lots of other applications using the 2.4Ghz. Any recommendations to get the 2.4GhZ working on a decent way? Limiting the channel bw to 22Mhz is 1 thing, any other big ones? 
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Nicolas Maton

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Posted 4 years ago

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Martin Ericson

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RF design is not magic. Its about learning basic physical rules and use them to your advantage.
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Martin Ericson

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Leave the 2.4 GHz for non-WiFi stuff. Get the White paper from Devin Akin and Keith Parsons.
 2.4 GHz works fine if you control your environment/eauipment, are not surrounded by neighbors and have single store buildings stretch out.  It is difficult to get decent capacity out of 2,4 GHz.
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Nicolas Maton

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That is exactly the problem, some area's are able to migrate to the 5Ghz. But some aren't so getting the 2.4Ghz working is really difficult in a noisy environment. 
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Tom Carpenter

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Wait a minute. You mean there are environments where the WLAN designer cannot simply do whatever is desired to get good coverage and capacity? :-) (bad humor, sorry)
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Nicolas Maton

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Haha ...it is what it is .. if no extra channels will be available in the 5ghz in the future, i guess we will run into the same issues as we have with the 2.4ghz today.. 
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Raymond Hendrix

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I always compare it with rooms... if room 2.4 has a lot of people, speaking different languages,  in there it's hard to understand each other. room 5 is bigger and can hold a lot more people before interferring with each other.
Try and convince your client to switch rooms.
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David Coleman, Employee

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The future of Wi-Fi is 5 GHz.  The 2.4 GHz band is too small, overloaded with interfering devices and a high noise floor. The 2.4 band is often called a "JUNK band"
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Nicolas Maton

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I agree, but the 5ghz channels are also limited.. certainly if you start using 160mhz ... (802.11ac) :(
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Raymond Hendrix

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you don't often need 160mhz channels.. i only use them in PtP links
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alfmckim

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The use cases for 180 MHz are few and far between, given the SNR requirements and other factors. Most applications will not require the throughput that 180 MHz channels offer.
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alfmckim

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I meant 160 MHz. Won't allow me to edit...
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David Coleman, Employee

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802.11ac technology does not operate in the 2.4 band and only on 5 GHz.  - The 5 Ghz band has a lot more channels with more frequency space coming soon.  5 Ghz is the present and future of Wi-Fi