Radio Mode 802.11na or 802.11ng

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I have a new HP Revolve 810 laptop sitting next to an Aerohive AP330. A single SSID, wifi0 set for 11ng and wifi1 set for 11ag. The laptop has adapter settings Wireless mode 802.11a/g, Fat Channel Intolerance disabled, 802.11n mode enabled, and both 802.11n channel widths set to auto.

When I connect to the AP, I see it as either Radio Mode 802.11a or Radio Mode 802.11g. But my android phone in my pocket shows Radio Mode 802.11ng. (As seen from our Hivemanager virtual appliance.)

What am I missing to get the laptop to connect at 802.11n.
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Dennis Creighton

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Posted 5 years ago

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Dennis Creighton

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I answered my own question. From the Intel site for my n-6205 adapter they say,

WEP and WPA-TKIP are not compatible with 802.11n.
Data rate will not exceed 54 Mbps when WEP or TKIP encryption is configured. I was using TKIP instead of AES.
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Brian Powers, Champ

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Thats more of the 802.11 standard, not Intels. The 802.11n amendment only supports open authentication or encryption using AES.

How was your phone showing up as 802.11n? Public (Open) network SSID?
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Matthew Gast

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Yup, it's in clause 11.1.6 in the last paragraph of the 2012 revision of 802.11. (802.11n-2009 was rolled into 802.11-2012, so the 11n amendment no longer stands alone.)

Wi-Fi certification testing has several options for a product vendor to implement the WEP & TKIP restriction. What most of us do is to restrict the data rate on WEP and TKIP frames to 54 Mbps. But you really shouldn't be using either of them. WEP was broken ten years ago, and TKIP is only a set of seat belts on WEP to keep it from being thrown through the windshield.

802.11ac works the same way in that you only get the good speeds if you stop using WEP or TKIP.
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Dennis Creighton

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Group Policy (setup years ago here) was forcing domain clients to TKIP even though we were using WAP-Enterprise. A simple group policy change to AES fixed all of these. Any device (like my Android Phone) that is not on the AD domain didn't have this forced policy.

Thanks for the info on the 802.11 standard. I found the comment on the Intel website but as you say, it is not specific to Intel adapters.