Let the discussion begin: How to Become a Wi-Fi Expert

  • 9
  • Idea
  • Updated 4 years ago
  • (Edited)

Thank you for joining our live discussion on what you need to know and do to  become a Wi-Fi expert.

Not sure what this is about? Not everyone has Wi-Fi expertise, but a lot of people want, or need, it. Your organization may be rolling out Wi-Fi and you need to learn a new skill. Or perhaps you have your eye on a career change, but your experience is more rooted in network management (the wired kind).

For the next five hours (9am PST - 2pm PST,) during which you can come and go as you please, and chime in as much as you'd like, we will cover a range of topics aimed at helping you get started learning, or advancing, your Wi–Fi knowledge. Ask, learn, share.



Everything you need to know to participate is spelled out here. As for the event itself and what we will cover, here's what to expect:

9 - 10am PST  - CWNP and vendor neutral training
10am - 11am PST - Other training resources
11am - 12pm Hands-on Training
12 - 1pm PST – Career opportunities
1pm - 2pm PST – Importance of Wi-Fi Design and troubleshooting

We have some cool giveaways too! 


Everyone who *registers AND participates – and by "participate" we mean asks or replies to a thread – gets a free booklet, which is an excerpted chapter (WLAN Troubleshooting and Design) from the latest edition of the CWNA Study Guide. (must register AND participate to be eligible)


Additionally, you will be able to compete to win one of ten copies of the full CWNA Study Guide or win the Grand Prize - a CWNA Premium Self-Study Kit (value $595). 


The operative word to winning anything is "participate." We don't want to just talk about what we think you want to know. Nor do we assume we know everything. We want to hear from YOU -  your questions, your knowledge. All *input is welcome. (*as expected, community guidelines for tone and good sportsmanship apply)


Contest Rules: The top 10 *most active participants will win a copy of CWNA Study Guide 4th edition. The TOP most active participant wins the GRAND PRIZE - the CWNP study kit. (*most active defined as posting, replying and liking)


Not familiar with us? Let me introduce myself, and David Coleman.

David Coleman is the Global Training Manager for Aerohive Networks, creators of the cooperative control wireless LAN (WLAN) architecture. David is in charge of Aerohive training programs for all partners and customers throughout the globe. In his spare time, David writes white papers and books about enterprise Wi-Fi networking. David is the coauthor of Sybex Publishing's "CWNA Study Guide" - ISBN# 978-1118893708 and "CWSP Study Guide" - ISBN# 0470438916. Follow David on Twitter: @mistermultipath

Tom Carpenter is the author of fifteen books on topics of interest to technical professionals published by McGraw-Hill and Sybex, including Wireless Networking, SQL Server, Windows Administration and VoIP. He is currently the CTO at CWNP and is responsible for setting the direction and managing the content for the certifications available for Wireless LAN professionals.  He also teaches technical and professional development classes. Follow Tom on Twitter: @carpentertom 

Photo of Tom Carpenter

Tom Carpenter

  • 67 Posts
  • 44 Reply Likes

Posted 4 years ago

  • 9
Photo of Anthony Zotti

Anthony Zotti

  • 13 Posts
  • 12 Reply Likes
Looking forward to see what comes out of this today. Interesting concept.
Photo of John McGonigal

John McGonigal

  • 2 Posts
  • 1 Reply Like
I am curious to.  I have had my position changed recently and my employer has taken 95% of my responsibilities away from me.  I am looking to change my position, increase my skill, and get on with my life.  I see wi-fi as an arena a huge needs going into the future.
Photo of David Coleman

David Coleman, Official Rep

  • 209 Posts
  • 164 Reply Likes
The WI-Fi industry is growing every year.  Lot's of career opportunities. 
Photo of Trudy Lindstrom

Trudy Lindstrom

  • 6 Posts
  • 7 Reply Likes
How do I actually see/hear this event?
Photo of Amanda

Amanda

  • 396 Posts
  • 25 Reply Likes
Hi Trudy, as mentioned below in my reply to Brandon, this is an interactive discussion so it's online discussion-only, no audio or visual. Thanks for participating!
Photo of Trudy Lindstrom

Trudy Lindstrom

  • 6 Posts
  • 7 Reply Likes
Thanks for responding
Photo of Jenni

Jenni

  • 93 Posts
  • 7 Reply Likes
Come on over to the first part of the discussion thread here: http://bit.ly/1BNhsNy
Photo of Delvin

Delvin

  • 2 Posts
  • 1 Reply Like

I wanted to get a better understanding on Wi-Fi in a sense to be able to configure and deploy hardware that I can access remotely via Wi-Fi. not sure if its possible since you need equipment to have connection all the time.

Photo of Trudy Lindstrom

Trudy Lindstrom

  • 6 Posts
  • 7 Reply Likes
As an Administrative Assistant for the IT dept. how can this knowledge be used to assist them?
Photo of Brandon Pangle

Brandon Pangle

  • 1 Post
  • 1 Reply Like
I'm excited about this too. Is there any audio/video or is it strictly forum based ?
Photo of David Coleman

David Coleman, Employee

  • 27 Posts
  • 29 Reply Likes
Strictly forum based in this event
Photo of Amanda

Amanda

  • 396 Posts
  • 25 Reply Likes
Hi Brandon - This discussion is strictly forum-based because it's interactive and we want to hear from you all - no audio or visual as you would find with a webinar. Thank you for joining!
Photo of Jenni

Jenni

  • 93 Posts
  • 7 Reply Likes
Brandon, come on over to the first part of the discussion thread here: http://bit.ly/1BNhsNy
Photo of Martin Ericson

Martin Ericson

  • 34 Posts
  • 20 Reply Likes
A very nice ares to work with in WiFi is design. A lot of WLAN are still set up adhoc without any real design goal to met. This will become more crucial since those networks will be stressed to max with all the BYOD, smart devices they need to support. With design as part of your skills set, you do not have to learn every details of how to setup and manage the infrastructure devices since all have to follow basic physical laws and those laws are vendor-neutral.
Photo of James Zurwell

James Zurwell

  • 3 Posts
  • 3 Reply Likes

I was hoping this would be Audio / Video as well... and was hoping to learn where to place the Access Points to ensure maximum coverage.

Photo of James Zurwell

James Zurwell

  • 3 Posts
  • 3 Reply Likes

I wasn't expecting a simple answer... I expected it to be complex, but are there any guidelines... or programs... I'm guessing I would need to "map" the floor... or in my case buildings... and use that to determine where the AP's should be placed.

Photo of Amanda

Amanda

  • 396 Posts
  • 25 Reply Likes
Trudy and James, you are free to post any questions to our community as individual questions. 
Photo of @papageordy

@papageordy

  • 7 Posts
  • 0 Reply Likes
You should not design for maximum coverage only. Always design to customer requirements.
Photo of James Zurwell

James Zurwell

  • 3 Posts
  • 3 Reply Likes

in my case, the users are spread out in a few areas so in those areas, max coverage falls under User requirements....

in other areas, they are much closer together and connections have a tendance to drop... when I go back and check the accesspoints, I see high user counts on the AP that I was likely on.

Photo of @papageordy

@papageordy

  • 7 Posts
  • 0 Reply Likes
the term Max coverage is a bad one. You should really be asking "whats the minimal coverage" eg min coverage of say -67dBm at my cell edge with SNR >20dBm
Photo of Trudy Lindstrom

Trudy Lindstrom

  • 6 Posts
  • 7 Reply Likes
Is it just me, I don't understand.  Are we merely supposed to ask questions and hope someone responds?  I've asked 2 questions and nothing so now I am wondering if I am not logged in properly or something..... 
Photo of Jenni

Jenni

  • 93 Posts
  • 7 Reply Likes
Yes, you can ask questions on the thread and you will get a response. Right now we are still on this thread: http://bit.ly/1BNhsNy Did you ask your questions in there?
Photo of Joël Stouwdam

Joël Stouwdam

  • 18 Posts
  • 4 Reply Likes
Looking forward to all the upcoming post. I'd like to hear more about the CWNA and CWNP studies as i like to get studing.
Photo of Danny

Danny

  • 3 Posts
  • 2 Reply Likes
me to!
Photo of Jenni

Jenni

  • 93 Posts
  • 7 Reply Likes
Check out this thread here: https://community.aerohive.com/aerohive/topics/why-the-cwnp-program we are talking about that now
Photo of Joël Stouwdam

Joël Stouwdam

  • 18 Posts
  • 4 Reply Likes
thnx Jenni
Photo of James Adkins

James Adkins

  • 7 Posts
  • 4 Reply Likes
How important is a Wifi certification versus experience if you're looking for job placement?
Photo of Martin Ericson

Martin Ericson

  • 34 Posts
  • 20 Reply Likes
Since most WLANs installed by people who have learned by experience without teh knowledge of RF design they will be flawed. You must have both.
Photo of David Coleman

David Coleman, Official Rep

  • 209 Posts
  • 164 Reply Likes
The number one priority is to get hands-on experience.  Certification will help validate skills. Many companies HR divisions look for CWNAs to CWNEs
Photo of Martin Ericson

Martin Ericson

  • 34 Posts
  • 20 Reply Likes
By studying the CWNP program and and have experience taking the exams is a receipt of your knowledge and is normally not that difficult if you know your stuff. God to how in your resume as a neutral proof of your RF WLAN knowledge.
Photo of Dennis DeWeerdt

Dennis DeWeerdt

  • 4 Posts
  • 0 Reply Likes
I work in a K-8 school where we have just installed Aerohive AP230's. As time is already too short, I'm looking for the best practices for configuring and tweaking my access points. I'm also looking for ways to track student traffic history.
 
Photo of Martin Ericson

Martin Ericson

  • 34 Posts
  • 20 Reply Likes
Dennis. Your design document should tell you from beginning how each AP should be configured even before physical installation.
Photo of Jeff Hutchins

Jeff Hutchins

  • 1 Post
  • 0 Reply Likes

I think this is a good discussion as wi-fi becomes more important for increased productivity of departments and increased mobility. 

Photo of David Coleman

David Coleman, Official Rep

  • 209 Posts
  • 164 Reply Likes
Wifi provide MOBILITY... which makes employees more productive and happy :)
Photo of James Adkins

James Adkins

  • 7 Posts
  • 4 Reply Likes
What if you're installing a new wlan that has a tool that can "hypothesize" on where the ap's should be placed and you have no design document. Would channels, power levels, cell coverage areas, etc need to be adjusted manually or would this depend on the vendor and product features?
(Edited)
Photo of Hans Matthé

Hans Matthé

  • 131 Posts
  • 28 Reply Likes
Offcourse is a good survey necesary, not only for the coverage but also for cappacity. Now days there are technology's included in the new wireless solutiones that uses self-healing systems, as DFS and DRS that take care for example of rate and channel switching. 
Photo of James Adkins

James Adkins

  • 7 Posts
  • 4 Reply Likes
Of course this would assume that you have the correct square footage of the building and floor, as well as floor plans imported.
Photo of James Adkins

James Adkins

  • 7 Posts
  • 4 Reply Likes
I agree, a physical site survey should be done before anything else.
Photo of David Coleman

David Coleman, Official Rep

  • 209 Posts
  • 164 Reply Likes
Predictive modeling tools are quite useful if you are properly trained on how to use them.  That being said, there is nothing wrong with an old-fashioned AP-on-a-stick site survey and using static channel and power settings when deploying
Photo of Phillip Zhou

Phillip Zhou

  • 5 Posts
  • 2 Reply Likes
If we put Aerohive APs at different location into a same "Hive", is there any potential performance issue? For example, we have 2 offices, one in SF and the another one in NY. Each office have about 10 APs, if we put all of them into one Hive, is that OK or not?
(Edited)
Photo of David Coleman

David Coleman, Official Rep

  • 209 Posts
  • 164 Reply Likes
No performance issue if in the same Hive.    Aerohive APs use layer 2 protocols to communicate. They only will communicate across the WAN if you set up a VPN
Photo of Phillip Zhou

Phillip Zhou

  • 5 Posts
  • 2 Reply Likes
Thank you!
Photo of James Adkins

James Adkins

  • 7 Posts
  • 4 Reply Likes
How many square feet can one access-point really cover?
Photo of Raymond Hendrix

Raymond Hendrix

  • 26 Posts
  • 12 Reply Likes
thats based on a lot of things.. surely this will be mentioned in the comming posts.
Radio coverage and capacity do not always match up...
Photo of Joël Stouwdam

Joël Stouwdam

  • 18 Posts
  • 4 Reply Likes
depends on the environment

Photo of Anthony Zotti

Anthony Zotti

  • 13 Posts
  • 12 Reply Likes
Depends on a bunch of factors. Building materials, number of clients to support, channel placement, channel width, frequency, etc.
Photo of James Adkins

James Adkins

  • 7 Posts
  • 4 Reply Likes
What is "best practice" for client count on a single access-point before oversubscription?
Photo of Joël Stouwdam

Joël Stouwdam

  • 18 Posts
  • 4 Reply Likes
throughput measurement? I think?
Photo of David Coleman

David Coleman, Official Rep

  • 209 Posts
  • 164 Reply Likes
The answer to that question is that it depends.  It depends on client count, user density, type of clients, type of applications
Photo of Hans Matthé

Hans Matthé

  • 131 Posts
  • 28 Reply Likes
In the CWNA course there are nice formulas to use as guidelince, but average 35 to 50 active connections per radio on an ac device for average use (webbrowsing).
Photo of Hans Matthé

Hans Matthé

  • 131 Posts
  • 28 Reply Likes
In the CWNA course there are nice formulas to use as guidelince, but average 35 to 50 active connections per radio on an ac device for average use (webbrowsing).
Photo of Codie Naquin

Codie Naquin

  • 9 Posts
  • 0 Reply Likes
what is the advantage of using AC over the more often used A,B,G,N wireless?
Photo of Codie Naquin

Codie Naquin

  • 9 Posts
  • 0 Reply Likes
Is there a standard frequency? 2.4GHZ? 5GHZ? anything like increased range or penetration? or is that all based off the frequency? 

Photo of Codie Naquin

Codie Naquin

  • 9 Posts
  • 0 Reply Likes
whats multi-user MIMO?
Photo of Hans Matthé

Hans Matthé

  • 131 Posts
  • 28 Reply Likes
spreads to different devices at same time (I believe max 4).
Photo of Hans Matthé

Hans Matthé

  • 131 Posts
  • 28 Reply Likes
ac also provide in higher throughput by the 80Mhz and 160Mhz channels, ans 256-qam modulation techniques
Photo of @papageordy

@papageordy

  • 7 Posts
  • 0 Reply Likes
802.11ac supports 5GHz only. Thats a huge advantage than the over crowded 2.4GHz ISM band.
Photo of Amanda

Amanda

  • 396 Posts
  • 25 Reply Likes
Hello everyone posting on this thread. Thank you for your participation! One important note: I recommend starting a new thread if you have a question or conversation to start separate from the general introductory tone of this thread. This will allow your question to get the attention it deserves. See this post for more details. 

https://community.aerohive.com/aerohive/topics/how-to-ask-a-question-how-to-become-a-wi-fi-expert-li...
Photo of Phillip Zhou

Phillip Zhou

  • 5 Posts
  • 2 Reply Likes
What is the most critical knowledge/skill for a general "Network Expert" to become a "Wi-Fi Network Expert"? 
Photo of Hans Matthé

Hans Matthé

  • 131 Posts
  • 28 Reply Likes
What was specially new for me was the fact that the wireless medium was a lot more difficult then the ethernet I was used to in cabled networks. There are a lot of interference situations and situations to deal with when designing a wireless solution.
Photo of Hans Matthé

Hans Matthé

  • 131 Posts
  • 28 Reply Likes
there is a lot of knowledge about RF necessary to implement an optimal wireless environment.
Photo of Manoah Coenraad

Manoah Coenraad, Champ

  • 72 Posts
  • 67 Reply Likes
You have to know the ins and outs about RF
Photo of Rasika Nayanajith

Rasika Nayanajith

  • 32 Posts
  • 21 Reply Likes
Hi Phillip,

You need to have basic understanding of Routing & Switching, which is the foundation for wireless networking. This is because WiFi is build on top of wired network & to give end to end service you have to have some knowledge of wired side.

Also basic understanding of RF is key as well. That's why I like this CWNA,CWNP program which covers those basics. Other vendor verification will cover how to configure their product, rather go into fundamentals how wireless works

HTH
Rasika
Photo of @papageordy

@papageordy

  • 7 Posts
  • 0 Reply Likes
know RF. Layer 1/2
Photo of Amanda

Amanda

  • 396 Posts
  • 25 Reply Likes
Hi all - closing this thread for discussion per my note above. Please post your questions as new threads so they get the attention they deserve. Sorry for the inconvenience!

Thank you,

Amanda