Installation guidelines

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Hey guys,

I downloaded the AP quick starts, in those documents you say the APs can be installed on-walls or on-ceilings, what is the best way to do it?
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Erick Muller

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Posted 5 years ago

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Andrew Garcia, Official Rep

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The omni antennas in our indoor APs are designed to radiate coverage in a donut-y shape (toroidal), that will provide better coverage horizontally than vertically. Since you can't alter the position when using the internal antennas (AP330 and AP121), these are better mounted on the ceiling to provide better performance at range.

If you have a unit with external antenna (AP350, AP141), you can mount them on the wall or ceiling. If mounting on the wall, the antennas should be positioned vertically (pointing up and down) to maximize on your donut.

Here's a link to the relevant help file entries:

The AP350 has six antenna connectors for attaching external antennas. You can connect up to six single-band dipole antennas to the male 802.11a/b/g/n RP-SMA (reverse polarity-subminiature version A) connectors. The AP350 has articulated and non-articulated antennas available as accessories. The three articulated 2.4 GHz antennas and three 5 GHz antennas have a 4-dBi gain. The three non-articulated antennas and three 5 GHz antennas have a 2-dBi gain. These antennas are omnidirectional, providing fairly equal coverage in all directions in a toroidal (donut-shaped) pattern around each antenna. For greater coverage on a horizontal plane, it is best to orient the antennas vertically. So that you can easily do that whether the AP chassis is mounted horizontally or vertically, the articulated antennas hinge and swivel. The non-articulated antennas are intended for wall installations and have a fixed orientation in the same direction as the antenna connectors.
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Erick Muller

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Wow this is a really nice reply. Thank you very much
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Crowdie, Champ

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If you have a multi-floor deployment the incorrect mounting of access points with omni-directional antennas (from here on just called the "access point") can be a major issue. Omni-directional antenna, as Andrew previously stated, propagate signal out in a flat (circular) "donut" style and are excellent for buildings with the standard 2.3 to 3.0 meter ceiling. The majority of the signal is propagated across a floor rather than between floors - although some signal will propagate between floors.

If the access point is incorrectly mounted, commonly flush against walls, so it is perpendicular to the floor rather than parallel the following occurs:

1. The expected signal propagation across the floor housing the access point will not occur and may result in coverage holes.

2. Access points in the floor above/below the floor housing the access point may be affected by the signal propagating from the incorrectly mounted access point(s) and can reduce their transmit power resulting in possible coverage holes.
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Marek Szymonski

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Andrew wrote "The omni antennas in our indoor APs are designed to radiate coverage in a donut-y shape (toroidal), that will provide better coverage horizontally than vertically".

But what position access point is then? Does it matter if access point is mounted verticaly on a wall or horizontally on ceiling?


In access points datasheets there are RF Coverage maps. I don't understand them completely. What do -20,-10,0dB mean?

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Crowdie, Champ

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But what position access point is then? 
The access point is mounted on the ceiling parallel to the floor.  The signal with a standard omni-directional antenna will propagate further horizontally than vertically. 

Does it matter if access point is mounted vertically on a wall or horizontally on ceiling?
If the same access point is mounted on the wall perpendicular to the floor the signal will propagate further towards the ceiling and floor than horizontally across the floor.

I commonly see installations with access points mounted this way and it can cause co-channel and adjacent channel contention on the floors above and below.
In access points datasheets there are RF Coverage maps. I don't understand them completely.
The best part of the Aerohive access point datasheets are the second page.  The "RF Coverage maps" show the signal propagation for each antenna.  The horizontal graph shows the signal propagation if you were looking down from above and the access point was in the centre of the graph.  The vertical graph shows the signal propagation if you were looking from the side again with the access point in the centre of the graph.

What do -20,-10,0dB mean?
I strongly recommend that you purchase David Colman's excellent CWNA Study Guide (http://www.cwnp.com/store/) as it covers wireless mathematics and the previously mentioned RF coverage maps.
 
David, with the amount of recommendations I give for your books the next time you are in town it is your shout for beers :-)