How to connect an SSID to the eth1 interface on an AP330?

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I'm trying to create a new SSID and connect it at layer-2 to the eth1 interface of an AP330 - as opposed to the normal method of trunking it over eth0/mgt0. So, I've created a new user profile with new VLAN 180, then in the device config set eth1 native VLAN to be 180 - but it's no go. I can see cdp neighbors on eth1 but a dhcp probe fails to reach the dhcp server in VLAN. Does anyone have some tips on how to do this?
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Kerry

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Posted 4 years ago

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Andrew MacTaggart, Champ

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http://www.aerohive.com/330000/docs/h...

Do not connect two APs in bridge-access or bridge-802.1Q mode to the same switch because they would both learn the same client MAC addresses on different interfaces, which would lead to routing problems. The default MAC route is never on an interface in bridge-access or bridge-802.1Q mode.
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Kerry

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That's OK, my eth0 & eth1 are both in backhaul mode, and connect to separate switches.

I guess I should rephrase the question - does anyone know how to configure an SSID which uses an untagged eth1 as backhaul?

I've got another SSID on the AP330 using untagged eth0/mgt0 VLAN1 for backhaul and working fine, and I'm trying to avoid using 802.1q trunks to the switches.

Thanks,
Kerry
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Andrew MacTaggart, Champ

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I could be wrong, but I don't think what you are trying to do is possible, but Aerohive guys might shine some light on the matter.

trunking, aggregating or making 2nd interface redundant

For APs with two Ethernet interfaces, it is possible to put one Ethernet interface in one mode and the other in a different mode. For example, eth0 can be in backhaul mode and eth1 in bridge-802.1Q or bridge-access mode, or eth0 can be in bridge-802.1Q mode and eth1 in bridge-access mode (in which case, one of the Wi-Fi interfaces must be in backhaul mode).

For an AP that has two Ethernet interfaces—any AP300 series device—there can be multiple active interfaces in backhaul mode. In this case, the AP uses the following logic to choose which interface to use for its default route:

If there is an Ethernet interface and a wireless interface in backhaul mode, the AP uses the Ethernet interface for its default route.

If there are multiple Ethernet interfaces in backhaul mode, the AP chooses which one to use for its default route in the following order:

It uses red0 or agg0 if one of them has at least one member interface bound to it and its link state is UP.

It uses ETH0 if neither red0 nor agg0 has any member interfaces and the link state for ETH0 is UP.

It uses ETH1 if neither red0 nor agg0 has any member interfaces, the link state for ETH0 is DOWN, and the link state for ETH1 is UP.

If there is no default route—perhaps because the Ethernet ports become disconnected and there is no wireless backhaul mesh available—the AP disables all its SSIDs to force wireless clients to associate with other APs.

When the Ethernet interface is in backhaul mode, it functions as a trunk port with the connecting switch and can support traffic on multiple VLANs. An AP whose Ethernet interface is in backhaul mode can act as a portal for APs deployed as mesh points in the same hive.