How many concurrent clients does Hive AP 121 support in VoIP context?

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Hi community,

I want to know how many concurrent clients does Hive AP 121 support in VoIP context and/or data navigation context? The same question for Hive AP 330.

Thank you all

Zak
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Zakaria

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Posted 5 years ago

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Brian Powers, Champ

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Based on the radio profile, the max number of clients each radio can handle is 100 users (granted, the wireless experience would be far from ideal with 200 users on a single AP).


As for how many VoIP calls can be made concurrently I believe is based on several factors (codec used, bitrate desired, etc.). Every vendor varies on their final number and I'm not sure what the limit is that Aerohive recommends per AP...
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Zakaria

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Thank you for the response.

In the worst case for Voice over WiFi, how many client are supported according to your experience? i have heard about 20 users. Is it possible?

Thankx again
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Brian Powers, Champ

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Way back in the 802.11b days, the company whose name rhymes with Crisco ;-) recommended no more than 7 calls per AP. Moving forward to 802.11a/g and those numbers creeped up into the teens and low 20's with proper design and low interference in the environment. So I'd like to assume that 20+ would surely work going forward as technology advances and Voice Enterprise http://www.wi-fi.org/knowledge-center... http://www.wi-fi.org/wi-fi-enterprise are starting being utilized by wireless vendors (Aerohive 6.x code supports this).
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Brian Powers, Champ

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Cant attest to the accuracy of this, but Tamosoft makes good wireless based software... And I'm far from a VoIP expert myself.

http://www.tamos.com/htmlhelp/voip-an...

With the advent of 802.11n technology that presently supports speeds up to 300 Mbps and will soon support 600 Mbps, the issue of the number of concurrent VoIP calls becomes less critical, but the older 802.11b (11 Mbps), 802.11g (54 Mbps), and 802.11a (54 Mbps) gear is still far more common than the newer 802.11n devices. Online bandwidth calculators are widely available; using one such calculator, the network administrator can get necessary metrics that depend on the 802.11 standard and codes being used. For example, for an 802.11g WLAN and G.729 as the VoIP codec, 27 simultaneous VoIP calls are recommended with an anticipated MOS of 3.8, with the maximum being 98 simultaneous VoIP calls with an anticipated MOS of 3.2. Using 802.11b instead of 802.11g decreases the number of simultaneous calls by approximately five times. Using a wideband G.711 codec with an 802.11g access point, 15 simultaneous VoIP calls are recommended with the anticipated MOS of 4.1, the maximum being 53 simultaneous VoIP calls with the anticipated MOS of 3.4.
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Gregor Vucajnk, Official Rep

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The rule of thumb is to plan for maximum of 20 concurrent VoIP sessions per radio. This, in parallel with good L1 design, will allow for acceptable MOS scores.

If the radios are also used to provide data and video, the MOS score will degrade, even if QoS is used. Then you have to adjust your design accordingly. If possible, reserving a band for voice and other for data helps a lot. This is getting easier with increasingly bigger support of 5GHz radios on both laptops and mobile devices.

At the end of the day. Plan, test, adjust, verify.

Gregor