High Ping times on Windows XP Machines only

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  • Updated 5 years ago
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Hi,

We are having a problems with XP machines connected to our APs (320s and 330s). The XP machines are complaining of slow connectivity and drop outs. Everything looks ok in Hivemanager and they are connecting to all the right places but if you ping from the AP to the client the ping times range from 5ms to 700+ms and average about 300ms with noticeable packet loss.

Machines with Windows 7 do not suffer this problem. I tested with two machines both with just windows OS loaded no other programs. Both machines were within 8ft of the AP. The Windows 7 machines had no problems yet the XP machines was still showing high ping times from the LAN to the client.

The weird thing is that if you ping from the client to AP or Switch in the LAN the ping times are much better with only the odd packet going above 5ms

This problem occurs both on 2.4 and 5ghz. I have notcied on the Wifi Status Summary for the effected APs we get this:

"Wifi0:High tx error Wifi1:High tx error"

Has anyone come across this before?

Cheers
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Chris Blakey

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Posted 5 years ago

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Nick Lowe, Official Rep

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While you have correlated this, I am suspicious of there being a causal relationship with Windows XP.

In the first instance, have you ensured that the drivers on the clients are up-to-date? It is more likely that they are out-of-date and buggy on XP clients.

Get drivers from the OEM (Intel, Realtek, Broadcom, Qualcomm Atheros etc.) if you can.
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Chris Blakey

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Hi,

Yes I made sure that all the wifi drivers were up to date on the test machines.

Cheers
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Crowdie, Champ

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When radios (WiFi0 = 2.4 GHz, WiFi1 = 5 GHz) report high transmit errors it means that they are having issues gaining access to the medium (basically they are having issues transmitting). This can be caused by the access points being too close, having a too high transmit power or the existence of non-WiFi interference. As both the 2.4 and 5 GHz radios are both reporting transmit errors it is more likely to be one of the first two possibilities.