General question about Aerohive...

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I'm sorry if this seems to be out of the gist since I can't seem to find the FAQ for Aerohive, so I decided to ask since I can't find a good enough answer.

Do you have to run a business to purchase a Aerohive network or can it be used as a guest network for home? In the future, I plan to run a business at home to fix computers and sell computer parts at my house and I would like to know if Aerohive can also sell a Wifi network to people at home who do business.

I first heard about this company in high school, while I was working with my network manager, I currently fix and repair computers like I did during my senior year in high school (Currently 19 residing at home and I study about computers still and how to repair them).

I would like to ask Aerohive if they also sell to people their Wifi networks for guests and such as I've also known that Cisco also happens to sell their Wifi networks to people to set up themselves.

I'd also like to know any useful features that the Wifi networks have.
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VMKCheat .

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Posted 3 years ago

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Matt Kopp

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Good Afternoon VMKCheat!

No, you do not need to run a business to purchase Aerohive.  You would need to purchase the access point from an Aerohive partner.  That being said, if a local partner does not suit your fancy, you may find access points (AP121 and AP141) at the Apple Store, online (http://store.apple.com/us/search/Aerohive).

If you are interested in purchasing an AP, I'd encourage you to reach-out to Aerohive (or attend a webinar and they'll call you!) to see where best to purchase from.

Welcome to the wonderful world that is IT!
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VMKCheat .

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Thanks for the information. After working with my high school network manager for half a year, I've looked through a lot on networking and other competing businesses, and I've seen that Aerohive has happened to have very powerful features.

Is a plan required in order to order one of these wifi networks? If so, what's the best plan that I should get, and is it easy for me to install myself when I order it in the future, or should I have someone do so for me (When I look at the access points, I see on ceiling and above ceiling, can someone tell me the difference between the two)?

When I also plan to secure my network, is it best to use 802.1x (Alternatively called WPA2-Enterprise) if possible or if the network is to be unsecured, require a username and password in order for others to access my Wifi?

(In example, say I get the network and I want to require a username and password, how would I allow certain people to have a username and password and allow them to use those credentials in order to
use my wireless wifi)?

P.S btw, I love that photo you posted. Kind of what my high school uses today for their "Guest" network, somewhat it requires a username and password to use internet on their wifi. My high school also had another network, which used 802.1x, but the secured one uses "iBoss" for their firewall, and their guest network was a Aerohive network.

Will save some money for the next several months so I can get the network. Thanks for all the information.
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Matt Kopp

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No worries.  Honestly, it would be both easy and beneficial if you setup your AP yourself.  That said, HMOL does include support - that support does include (and please don't kill me gents!!!) assistance with setup, if needed.

Any of Aerohive's APs can support LOCAL 802.1X as well as they can use Active Directory / Open Directory, if you have servers.  It is possible to combine both a guest network using a Captive Web Portal, or separate username/password, or Private Pre-Shared Key - the possibilities are endless.

The MSRP on an AP121/141 is $650 + HMOL; AP230's are going for $800 + HMOL.  They aren't the least expensive on the market - by any stretch - but they're incredibly robust devices.  Again, check-out the webinars, they're worth it.