Difference between 2,4 and 5G antenna

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Can somebody explain me the physical difference is between 2,4 and 5G antenna's?
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Steven Liefferinckx

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Posted 5 years ago

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Gregor Vucajnk, Official Rep

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Steven, are you interested in general difference / info on antennas or the antennas used by us in our product line?

Gregor
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Steven Liefferinckx

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Gregor, actually in both. I'm wondering what's the differences is between 2.4 and 5G antenna's in general and Aerohive using these antenna's as internal and external on their products.

Steven.
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Gregor Vucajnk, Official Rep

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1. General

Radio Frequency has a set of physical properties. One of those is the wavelength of the signal. On 2,4 GHz this is approximately 12,5 cm (4.92 inches) and 5-6 cm (2-2.3 inches) on 5 GHz. The difference and approximation is due to the fact that the wavelength is the result of the direct correlation of the exact frequency (2,400 - 2,483.5 GHz in 2.4 GHz range and 5,250 to 5,725 GHz in 5GHz range).

To optimise sending and receiving the signal, antenna is designed around those physical properties. The elements inside the antennas will vary in size to match the wavelength (or more commonly 1/4 or 1/8th the size of the wavelength).

So first and foremost difference in between is the size of the antennas. 2.4 GHz antennas are bigger than 5GHz antennas. Mind that the same size antenna enclosure may be used for various reasons, two biggest ones being the cost of development and production and also overall aesthetics.

There are many types of the antenna types available, dipole omni antennas, patch, and yagi antennas, just to name a few. There are many subtypes, to many to name all of them here. Different antenna type will provide different RF pattern. Starting with dipole-omni antenna that will provide 360 degree coverage in vertical setup (point of the antenna facing straight up or down) to focused, narrow width antennas used for Point to Point communication. And everything in between. The RF focus will result in the higher gain of the antenna as it directs all the available energy into certain direction.

2. Aerohive specific

a) integrated antennas:

All our new products have dual-polarised integrated antennas. Polarization is the orientation of the elements within the antenna that allow sending/receiving the signal in certain alignment. This allows our units to be placed on the celling and on the walls, depending on the RF design you are pursuing. It also allows for better reception of the signal originated from mobile devices that often change orientation while additionally providing advanced features like dual polarized MRC. more specifics can be found in our Hardware reference guide: http://www.aerohive.com/330000/docs/h...
Properties of specific antennas and their coverage pattern can be found in the data-sheet documents for each product.

b) external antennas:

Internal APs 141, 350 and 390 have external antennas. Mostly omni antenna kit is used. AP141 uses 4 antennas (2x 2.4 GHz antennas and 2x5GHz antennas) while 350 and 390 use 6 antennas (3 for each band respectively). Some of the competitors use dual-band antennas. While this may be convenient as only 3 antennas are required, the fact is that dual-band antennas compromise in performance due its design and that was unacceptable for us.

External AP170 also uses external antennas. Mostly high gain omni antennas are used, 2 for each band.

Depending on the use case and design, directional antennas may be preferred. We offer 120degree sector antenna and highly directional 17 degree antenna. You can learn more about those here: http://aerohive.com/products/access-p...

If you have any specific question please ask.

Gregor
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Anji

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I've few doubts in deciding which antenna to use in my project . Please help me

1. How one can know the gain (dB) of an antenna when constructing it & on what basis gain will be calculated?
2. What will happen if two antennas of different gain (dB) are used at Transmitting & Receiving sides.
 

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Amanda

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Hi Anji, would you mind posting your question as a brand new thread? This is a new question separate from the original question, and starting a new thread will help it get seen by other community members. Simply scroll up to the top of this page and click the post button.


 


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Joseph Scott Van Wye

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2.4 Ghz is Approximately twice the wave length as 5 Ghz. A 2.4 Ghz 1/4 dipole should work both bands. It will become a 1/2 wave on the 5 Ghz band. We do it in ham radio all the time.
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Edward Nice

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1) On an Aerohive AP such as the AP141 with external antennas, does simply orienting one antenna vertically and the other horizontally provide 'dual-polarization'?

2) In an inside deployment of APs which are densly placed to support wireless IP phones (such as ASCOM), is the coverage pattern of the AP121 better suited with its lower gain integrated antennas or am I better served by the AP141s with the external Antennas?  Coverage overlap signal strength is important for raoming.


(Edited)
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Gregor Vucajnk, Official Rep

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1. Indeed it does. Find the recommended setup of our AP141, 350 and 390 in the Hardware reference guide: http://www.aerohive.com/330000/docs/help/english/documentation/Aerohive_HardwareReferenceGuide_33001...
Page 9 onwards.

2. Depends on the actual deployment. I would argue that AP121 will give you easier design vector for HD and VoIP. However AP141 gives you the ability to use external antennas and the ability to design your RF much more in detail. 

My advice... Go with AP121 unless you have explicit RF design goal based on your environment.