Changing BR200 config from DHCP to static rolls back to DHCP after 10 minutes.

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Hi, I'm trying to push a config in China from the UK to a BR200 router (via HMOL) to change an IP assignment and gateway from DHCP to static. The Aerohive router is currently located with a user at their home, hence the DHCP from their home router. On Monday the user will take the BR200 router to their new office However, this weekend, when I push a static configuration for the office to the BR200 router, after 10 minutes the configuration rolls back for DHCP. How do I push a config and tell the BR200 not to roll back after 10 minutes? Can this be done over SSH via CLI followed by issuing a no rollback command?

Unfortunately there is no console cable, otherwise I would do this via CLI.

I read on these forums that powering off the BR200 router after pushing the config with a static IP before the 10 minutes, but after it restarts will prevent the rollback. I might not be able to contact the user before Monday and ask them to disconnect the BR200 straight after a reboot.

Kind regards,


Ed

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Ed

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Posted 3 years ago

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Nick Lowe, Official Rep

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Ed,

This usually means that after the configuration change, connectivity to HiveManager is lost. HiveOS waits for a while before deciding to roll back to the previous configuration.

This is intended to be a convenience feature to stop mistaken configuration changes taking a device offline, making it unmanageable remotely.

Have you checked that there is a usable default gateway and correct DNS settings with your static configuration?

Nick
(Edited)
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Andrew Garcia, Official Rep

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As Nick describes, we have a feature called config rollback.  In a nutshell, after a config change, if a device is not able to contact HiveManager for a set amount of time (15 minutes is the default, I think), the AP will roll back to the last known good configuration.

Since you are applying a static IP address for the NEXT location, the BR can not get on the network in the current location. 

My advice: push a complete configuration to the BR but DO NOT REBOOT the BR.  A complete config will not be activated until after a reboot.

When the user is ready to move, he/she can just unplug it and go to the next location.  The next time the BR boots, it will have the right IP address, because the new config will get activated.

One additional note: you can make it so the user can define a new IP address on the device my plugging a device into a wired port.  If the user has no Internet access, their web session will get redirected to the BR's address page, where they can enter their new info.

This is not the default behavior though:  you would need to turn it on.  This would apply for all routers using the network policy, so keep that in mind if you have a mix of office routers and telecommuter routers in the same network Policy.

<Your network Policy> -- Additional Settings -- Router Settings -- Enable WAN configuration through the NetConfig UI
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Nick Lowe, Official Rep

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Yup, I should have read his question less glancingly. Would it not make more sense to just use DHCP in both places? What's the need for configuring it statically?
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Ed

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Thanks for your tips. I like the 'Enable WAN configuration through the NetConfig UI'.
The issue I have is we are a global organisation with branch office in locations where we cannot ship to from the UK, so we order the routers within these countries. Our branch offices have static WAN IPs hence the requirement for non DHCP IP settings. We can easily configure a router from DHCP to static if the branch office already has an existing router and DHCP server. The problem arises where we open up a new office without any other existing network infrastructure with a DHCP server to connect the BR devices to.
For our case in China, I got the user to take BR200 home and plug it into their home router with DHCP and after multiple attempts of uploading the static configuration without rebooting (kept of aborting due to poor latency to the HMOL - big problem in China), they managed to connect the BR200 in their new office eventually.
It would be great if the BR router USB ports would be plug 'n' play for USB modems, hench detect carrier APN settings for mobile providers. This would overcome our provisioning issues.