AP130/230 mounting brackets

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  • Updated 10 months ago
Hi all,

I did a site survey today, the building has lots of open space internally, a huge atrium, mezzanine floors and not an awful lot of ceiling space to mount AP's, and what ceiling there is, is solid (no false ceiling grids). They do have structural pillars which the legacy APs (Cisco) are mounted on.

My question is what is the latest thoughts about mounting AP's (specifically 130/230) vertically (i.e. on the pillars)? I've always thought they need to be mounted horizontally to get the best coverage (toroidal pattern) - is this still the case?

If so is there a right-angled bracket available that will allow me to mount the AP's horizontally but attached to the pillars? I did see a post on here from someone who has fashioned something like this, just wondering if Aerohive have anything that we can order?

Also if I mount these AP's to the ceiling, has anyone screwed the standard clip -bracket to a ceiling or is there some other bracket required? Is it possible to get fingers round the back to depress the catches so the AP can be twisted off?

Cheers,

Paul
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Paul

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Posted 3 years ago

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Hans Matthé

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Hi Paul

The AP130 and 230 are omni directional, it's best practice to mount them horizontally by the pattern they create. Mostly we use semidirectional AP's for mounting vertically. You can use the AP141 for example, this is a AP121 with external antennas.
I believe Aerohive has two clips, one to screw on a ceiling or wall and one for fake ceilings. The system is very easy to use by clicking the ap's in the brackets and get them back off if necesary.
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Carsten Buchenau, Champ

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It's always good practise to consult the data sheet of each AP you are going to install, and to check the RF patterns.

For example, the AP130:


So you see that the vertical distribution is "almost omni", but still not us good on 180° (= through the backside of the AP) than all other directions.

So yes, a good deployment method is to mount them horizontally under the ceiling, especially when the ceilings are high and locations are more in the middle of the room.

But there are scenarios where this might not be the ideal deployment.

For example, if ceilings are low and floors are long, it might be better to mount them vertically in a way to point down the hallway. Otherwise you very good distribution downwards to the next floor, but not as good sideways.

Another interesting example is a big room, e.g. an open office space. Running cables below the ceiling into the middle of the room might not always be an easy option. So it could be interesting to mount them vertically along the outside walls, facing inward. Which has another interesting side effect: you are lowering the emission outside your premises, reducing the risk of non-authorized people being able to catch your signal (and you avoid more interferences with your neighbours etc).

So, it's not always that easy... it depends heavily on the environment you are going to install, and what all the different parameters are (room size, ceiling height, wall thickness, available Ethernet outlets, ...).

A site-survey always helps: Get 1 - 3 APs, mount them temporarily in different ways and do measurements. You'll get the idea then.
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Mike

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Installed four AP130s vertically in a warehouse on iBeams at the height of our tallest ladder.  If the past we would rent a lift and place horizontally in the rafters.  Eliminating the cost of the lift and having the ability to easily access the devices for support were the driving factors in our decision to mount vertically on iBeams.

Created a heat map with power set to 10dBm to allow for an increase if range required greater coverage.

We have had these in place for over a year without a single complaint.  Have moved to mounting vertically as a standard practice for open ceilings and when a lift could not be used for future servicing.

 

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Patrick Spencer

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Hi, we used this camera 90deg mount upside-down to deploy AP's facedown.

Link to bracket