Aerohives and Ruckus in same environment, problems.

  • 1
  • Question
  • Updated 3 years ago
I am bring ap230s into my network. I have been removing Ruckus aps and replacing with Aerohives. The Aerohives seem to be considerably under powered compared to the Ruckus and I may have to roll back their deployment. Any thoughts on getting ap230s to play well with Ruckus aps?
Photo of Kevin Carne

Kevin Carne

  • 3 Posts
  • 0 Reply Likes

Posted 3 years ago

  • 1
Photo of Nick Lowe

Nick Lowe, Official Rep

  • 2491 Posts
  • 451 Reply Likes
I wonder if, perhaps, you are going about this or thinking about it in the wrong way.

You do not just want to just take APs down and put another in exactly the same place. Rather, you need to perform an assessment of the site with the right tools to determine optimal AP placement which will give you the number needed for your environment.

You may wish to employ the services of a company who can do all of this for you.

Ruckus' APs do have different antenna characteristics, their BeamFlex adaptive antenna technology is one of their competitive differentiators. This does not mean, however, that Aerohive's APs are comparatively underpowered.

With clients, we are not really interested in the range by itself, we are instead interested in the date rate-over-range that clients can achieve and if there sufficient capacity in the servicing cell to cope with the demands placed on it. This varies a lot based on the intended/expected client mix.

Deploying APs is all about the frequency reuse and, because of that and certainly in more dense environments, usually wanting and implementing smaller cell sizes so that clients within those cells get good performance. This is because they get access to the higher data rates (so use less airtime for a quanta of data) and experience less interference or contention.

Could you give a little more detail about how you are deploying the APs so that we can help you more?
(Edited)
Photo of Nick Lowe

Nick Lowe, Official Rep

  • 2491 Posts
  • 451 Reply Likes
This is certainly not the whole truth and skips over a lot to not turn my response in to something stupidly long and too technical. The salient point really is that you ought to use the right tools to get APs placed appropriately for your needs, don't just put them where other APs happened to be. Wireless design is very much an iterative process.

I should have also said deploying APs is increasingly significantly about achieving frequency reuse. It's not -all- about it, clearly! :)
(Edited)
Photo of Kevin Carne

Kevin Carne

  • 3 Posts
  • 0 Reply Likes
Thanks for all the input. I have been running a ZoneDirector 1100 with zf7962 (802.11n) aps. I am moving to an ap in every classroom and so far have put 23 aerohive 230s in rooms. Sever Ruckus zf7962s have come out. The a230 are going in with the stock config and I will admit I have not had enough time to tweak them. The problem is they seem to be "low strength" compared to the Ruckus even with the power moved from auto to 20. Is there a manner to block the Aerohives from being interfiered with by the Ruckus? The aps are not in the same rooms and they are in different sections of the building. Thanks.
Photo of Nick Lowe

Nick Lowe, Official Rep

  • 2491 Posts
  • 451 Reply Likes
(Edited)
Photo of Andrew MacTaggart

Andrew MacTaggart, Champ

  • 483 Posts
  • 86 Reply Likes
Nick makes some good points.

Are you replacing 802.11n APs or 802.11b/g?
Are you looking for coverage or dense deployment?
What model of Ruckus AP and ZoneDirector?
Have you enabled TxBF on the AH APs?
Aerohive's current release of Transmit Beamforming is Single-User beamforming providing possible gains of 2 to 5 dB, that might provide a rate shift at medium ranges.

Cheers
A
Photo of Kevin Carne

Kevin Carne

  • 3 Posts
  • 0 Reply Likes
It looks like from what I am reading that I should take the aerohives out of the building and put the Ruckus back in place. The site work was done for the Ruckus and the strength was good throughout the building. My district is moving to the Hive but maybe my building does not play well with the ap230s. Thanks for all the input.
Photo of Crowdie

Crowdie, Champ

  • 972 Posts
  • 272 Reply Likes
My government runs a tender process for deploying wireless networks at state schools that dictates one access point per two rooms (this is the first mistake).  These tenders are always won by people who have no idea what they are doing (the second mistake), as they are the cheapest, and they put highly powered Ruckus "adaptive antenna" access points in and provide heat maps showing excellent signal levels across the school and everybody is happy.  The third mistake was the choice of tender company as they just want to get the deployments done rather than done well.

The issue is once the number of wireless devices grow.  I have gone in and commonly I see:

  • Poor roaming as the wireless clients are "sticky" (reluctant to roam) due to the excessive amount of signal coming out of the Ruckus access points.
  • The whole school is covered in co-channel contention.  When you are testing with a couple of iPads you will not notice it but when you deploy voice/video or increase the density of wireless clients the performance is poor (lost video frames, poor voice quality, etc.)
The point I am making is not that Ruckus is bad (far from it) but that wireless networks have to be designed by a wireless engineer who understands 802.11 and the pros and cons of each wireless vendor.  If you don't do this then your wireless performance will, at some point, be poor and it will cost you more to resolve than getting it done properly in the first place would have.
(Edited)