802.11ac design

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  • Updated 5 years ago
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Hello,

We are designing and deploying wifi 802.11ac for a hospital site and are proposing Aerohive solution.

Can you recommend a good tool to survey a hospital with 12 floors and 5 different sites.

Thanks,
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Aleem Quadri

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Posted 5 years ago

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Matthew Gast

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Thank you for proposing Aerohive!

We do have a planning tool which you've probably already used. Depending on the coverage needs of the hospital, you may not need 802.11ac everywhere. What most users are doing right now is to see what the 802.11n baseline is, and then figure out the spots where higher-performance is required.
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Andrew MacTaggart, Champ

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In a multi story structure would a AP with higher gain antennas be preferred to flatten the e-plane. I would imagine if .ac is bonding more channels you could end up with more co-channel interference from the floors above and below. I currently seeing it with .n bonding 2 channels even with the dfs channels enabled.

Cheers
A
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Matthew Gast

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The amount of inter-floor interference depends on the construction of the building. I once did a network design for a school building in California, and there's a specific state law that requires that buildings with students be built to sustain large earthquakes. (This particular building was I think quite literally on the Hayward fault, but I could be wrong -- the fault did run through the campus.) As a result of the strong building codes, the floors were thick steel pans with massive amounts of concrete. There was no transmission between floors in that building!
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Matthew Gast

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When you use external antennas, it's important to make sure you're not trading one type of interference for another. You can use external antennas to keep the coverage going horizontally from the AP on a single floor, but that may come at the cost of causing more inter-AP interference within a floor. In general, I've found that the floor/ceiling knocks the signal down enough that most of the time the primary worry will be interference between APs on the same floor.